News

  • June 11, 2018 | Chicago Reporter

    Instead of Extending the Red Line, Some See Promise in the Metra Electric

    Uncertainty around federal funding to extend the Chicago Transit Authority’s Red Line to the city’s southern limits has sparked discussions on whether to build the $2.3 billion extension at all or find alternatives to improve transit for Far South Side residents. South Side resident Michael...

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  • June 08, 2018 | CityLab

    New York City Will Cut Transit Fares for Low-Income Riders

    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and City Council speaker Corey Johnson have reached a deal, as of yet unannounced, to provide reduced-fare transit cards to low-income residents, the New York Times reported Thursday. Under the terms of the agreement, those living below the federal poverty...

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  • June 06, 2018 | StreetsBlog Chicago

    Transportation Planning Needs to Become Less "Stale, Pale, and Male"

    During his keynote speech at the Transport Chicago conference, Equiticity founder and president Oboi Reed called for increased ownership of the transportation planning process in areas populated by “black, brown, and indigenous people of color.” He argued that one reason why...

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  • June 02, 2018 | Washington Post

    Are Dockless Bikeshare Systems Changing Washington's Biking Culture?

    The new dockless bike-share companies that have taken off in the District are attracting a different kind of customer than the traditional Capital Bikeshare system: Their riders are more racially diverse, slightly younger and less affluent, according to transportation officials and an academic...

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  • May 30, 2018 | StreetsBlog USA

    What Happened When a Detroit Politician Rode the Bus to Work

    Detroit transit is famous for all the wrong reasons. To get to the sprawled-out suburbs where the jobs are, people without access to a car have to make multiple transfers on routes operated by different agencies, often with long, long walks in between. Despite recent campaigns to create a...

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  • May 14, 2018 | StreetsBlog San Francisco

    Decision Time: Sustainable and Equitable Transportation or a Bankrupt BART?

    On May 24th the BART board will likely vote on whether to build a five-mile, $1.6 billion rail extension or a much more cost-effective bus alternative. AB 758 requires that BART take action on an alternative before the end of June, or they will lose control of the project’s future. BART should...

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  • May 12, 2018 | Star Tribune

    Met Council's Equity Push Hard to See on the Ground

    Commuters who miss the bus during rush hour on Rice Street in St. Paul used to wait half an hour for the next one. Now the Route 62 rolls up every 15 minutes. Every two years, dozens of transportation projects compete for a slice of the region’s federal money. Route 62 had something special...

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  • May 08, 2018 | NextCity

    Seattle Raises the Equity Bar on Transit-Oriented Development

    Over the next two decades, Sound Transit — the transit agency serving the greater Seattle area — will buy a lot of land as it builds out its second and third phases of light rail expansion. Much of that land will be used as staging areas for new station construction. As that construction wraps...

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  • May 06, 2018 | HeraldNet

    Sound Transit 'Equity' Not Serving Greatest Needs

    We have heard repeatedly from our constituents who live in the Sound Transit district that they care about three things: having more mass transit options that get them out of their cars; minimizing taxes; and completing the light rail spine (including Everett) as quickly as possible. The passage...

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  • April 20, 2018 | The Hoya

    Uber Set to Expand in District

    Uber is seeking to expand beyond the ride-sharing industry in Washington, D.C., to provide a larger transportation network for District residents. Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in a panel discussion on the future of mobility with D.C. Mayor Muriel Bower on April 11. Both emphasized the need to...
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  • April 20, 2018 | Tennessean

    In Nashville Mayor's Race, David Briley Is All Alone WIth Transit Push

    Nashville Mayor David Briley, one month into his job, has invited a reporter to tag along for the nearly two-mile hike from his home to his office inside the Metro courthouse. His morning stroll isn't a daily routine, but rather an occasional exercise, and there's another purpose. Briley is...
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  • April 20, 2018 | Crosscut

    Come to Seattle - Just Don't Bring Your Car With You

    Recent weeks have been genuinely dizzying in terms of transportation policymaking about the future of how we get around Seattle. Mayor Jenny Durkan halted ongoing construction of the Center City Connector which would stitch two separate streetcar lines together with dedicated lanes. Her...

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  • April 14, 2018 | Why New York City Stopped Building Subways

    Why New York City Stopped Building Subways

    In the first decades of the 20th century, New York City experienced an unprecedented infrastructure boom. Iconic bridges, opulent railway terminals, and much of what was then the world's largest underground and rapid transit network were constructed in just 20 years. Then it stopped. Since...
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  • April 13, 2018 | NRDC

    L.A. Is Flipping the Script on Commuting

    If done right, shared modes of transportation can help underserved Angelenos and the environment. Los Angeles is primed to reinvent transportation—and this time there’s an opportunity to make things better for the local community and environment.

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  • April 12, 2018 | CityLab

    A Single Way Forward on Two of New York's Biggest Problems

    Consider “transit growth zones” to address both decaying infrastructure and affordable housing. As anyone who has visited New York in recent years can discern, the city is in the midst of an acute transit crisis, which has been greatly exacerbated by the feckless leadership of the notoriously...

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  • April 10, 2018 | U.S. News and World Report

    Fighting for Breath in Near-Highway Neighborhoods

    Somerville, MA is working to reduce pollution exposure in communities where its threats loom large. In the neighborhoods straddling Interstate 93 in Somerville, residents know to keep their windows shut each weekday as commuters travel from Boston's suburbs into the city, their cars spouting...

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  • April 08, 2018 | Pamplin Media Group

    Weak Transit Hurting Working Class, Metro Leaders Say

    Decision makers say we must link housing, transportation to better accommodate growing population, reduce costs. More than half a million new residents are expected to move into the Portland area by the year 2040. This growth has already sent shockwaves through the region with rising housing...

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  • April 02, 2018 | NextCity

    Atlanta Gets an Ambitious New Transit Plan

    A bill that could expand transit and unify the county-by-county patchwork that makes up Atlanta’s transportation grid has passed the General Assembly. HB 930, the so-called “transit expansion bill,” now awaits a signature from Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, who has endorsed the measure.

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  • March 22, 2018 | Wired

    Cities Need to Take the Wheel

    Instead of blindly welcoming self-driving cars to their streets, city leaders have a chance to prevent tragedies like the Uber fatality from happening again. Never waste a good crisis. The awful news is that one of Uber’s self-driving cars hit and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona. If...

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  • March 21, 2018 | The Drive

    Elaine Herzberg's Death Isn't Uber's Tragedy. It's Ours.

    No one knows when self-driving cars will work. Until then, people are the solution. There are two kinds of tragedies: those from which nothing is learned, and those that lead to change. Now that a pedestrian has been killed by a self-driving car, let’s dispense with the fiction that safety is a...

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  • March 21, 2018 | University of Michigan News

    How Transportation Could Help Alleviate Poverty in Benton Harbor

    Today, 50 percent of city residents [of Benton Harbor] live below the poverty level, 24 percent are unemployed and access to a personal vehicle is no sure thing. Many rely on public transportation—the area's low-cost Dial-a-Ride service—since the majority of jobs are located outside Benton...

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  • March 20, 2018 | San Francisco Examiner

    N-Judah Commuters to See Service Increase

    San Francisco’s transit authority voted this week to make major changes to the N-Judah line, reducing the wait time between each rail car by three minutes in an effort to ease commuter crowding. Riders will see the frequency of the N-Judah increase from every seven minutes to every four minutes...

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  • March 07, 2018 | Westword

    RTD Is Not Increasing Fares for Low-Income Passes. At Least Not Yet.

    After the Denver Post and other outlets reported last week that the Regional Transportation District is going to raise local, regional, and airport fares to make up for new discount programs that support low-income and youth riders, RTD has been on the offensive to clear up what it says is a...
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  • March 02, 2018 | StreetsBlog LA

    Metro Approves Equity Platform

    Yesterday, the Metro board approved committing the agency to advancing equity. The Metro Equity Platform Framework was approved by the board's Executive Management Committee in February, then approved by the full board yesterday. Though the term "equity" is likely understood by many Streetsblog...
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  • March 02, 2018 | CityLab

    Patients Can Now Ride-Hail to the Hospital

    Uber's newest project allows doctors to call rides for their patients. For riders who don't use mobile phones, there's an analog version: Healthcare administrators can provide paper print-outs with passenger pick-up locations, driver license plate numbers, and car models. The rides can be...
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  • February 27, 2018 | StreetsBlog Denver

    The Overhaul of RTD's Fare Pass Programs Explained

    For the past year, a group of decision-makers in the transportation arena has been trying to increase access and ridership on the RTD transit system without digging any deeper into the underfunded agency's pockets. The vehicle? An overhaul of RTD's confusing and unfair fare pass programs....
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  • February 22, 2018 | StreetsBlog USA

    The Case for Decriminalizing Fare Evasion

    Nobody gets thrown in jail for not paying a highway toll or a parking meter. But for some reason people who break transit fare rules are subject to criminal penalties. In Washington, DC, jumping a turnstile is punishable by a fine of up to $300 and up to 10 days in jail. The Save Our System...
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  • February 22, 2018 | Momentum Mag

    More Bikes Mean New Bike Businesses

    While bike share is one of the most affordable transportation options in the city, the cost of a bike share membership can still be out of reach for many people. This means many low-income residents will continue to use public transit which has a low initial cost unlike a bike share membership...

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  • February 22, 2018 | Huntington News

    City Planner Urges Transit Equity through Community Engagement

    Northeastern University Archives led a discussion on transportation equity in Boston Feb. 13 and screened a documentary about the formation of the Silver Line, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s transit line that connects both Roxbury and the South End to downtown, the Seaport...

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  • February 15, 2018 | AP News

    Kept Out: How Banks Block People of Color from Homeownership

    Fifty years after the federal Fair Housing Act banned racial discrimination in lending, African Americans and Latinos continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgage loans at rates far higher than their white counterparts.This modern-day redlining persisted in 61 metro areas even when...

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  • February 14, 2018 | Huffington Post

    Can There Be Equity in the Bike Lane?

    Some cities are trying to make bike sharing more accessible — and to combat its elite image. They’re calling it bike equity. Bike sharing may be the ultimate symbol of gentrification, the province of avocado-toast loving, espresso-swilling — and mostly white — millennials. But some cities are...

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  • February 09, 2018 | CityLab

    Miami's Beleaguered Metrorail Gets a Real-Time Report Card

    Over the past week, more than 1,500 trains were scheduled to pass through downtown Miami’s Government Center Metrorail station. As of Thursday afternoon, just 383 arrived on time. The vast majority—927, to be exact—arrived late or bunched too closely to a previous train. And the remaining 208...

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  • February 06, 2018 | NJ.com

    Activists Call for More Electric Public Transportation

    Renewable energy advocates in Jersey City, NJ rallied in City Hall to call for the electrification of New Jersey's public transportation system. The event, organized by Jersey Renews along with the Amalgamated Transit Union, came the day after "transit equity day," an effort by the labor...

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  • February 05, 2018 | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    In Honor of Rosa Parks: An Appeal for Transit Equity

    Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. helped Americans to understand that civil rights included not only the right to vote and to ride in any seat on a bus, but the right to a decent home, the right to a good job, the right to join a union and other rights necessary for equal access to a good life. He...

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  • February 02, 2018 | StreetsBlog Denver

    Denver Loses an Advocate as Transit Alliance Closes Its Doors

    Transit Alliance is shutting down after 19 years advocating for better transit in Denver and the metro region. The organization was founded after a failed transit referendum in 1997, with the express intent of getting the $4.7 billion FasTracks transit funding measure over the finish line....

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  • February 02, 2018 | Inside Sources

    A New Way to Remember Rosa Parks

    Transit equity isn’t just about where you sit on the bus. It’s about whether you can get on a bus at all. The layout of rapid-transit systems determines the accessibility of jobs. Poorer people need access to those jobs so they could begin to move into the mainstream of American life — which...

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  • January 31, 2018 | New York Times

    For Health Care Workers, the Worst Commutes in New York City

    By now, the many ways New York City’s failing subway system has upended countless lives has been well documented. But a new report finds that no group has been hurt more than the city’s army of health care workers who fan out across the city every day to take care of older people, the frail and...

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  • January 29, 2018 | New York Times

    The Subway Is Next Door. Should New Yorkers Pay Extra for That?

    The notion that property owners should pay extra for their proximity to the subway is called “value capture” and has long been debated in urban planning circles. Now Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, has made value capture a prominent part of his plan to salvage the subway system by proposing to...

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  • January 26, 2018 | Washington Post

    Traveling While Black

    Some Americans are afraid to explore their own country out of concerns that evoke the Jim Crow-era Green Book. Although the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ended many discriminatory practices allowed under Jim Crow laws, similar risks and concerns have lingered. Motorists still fear encountering racist...

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  • January 24, 2018 | StreetsBlog USA

    The Racist Dog Whistles in Complaints About Dockless Bike-Share

    The arrival of dockless bike-share is changing the cycling landscape in some American cities. With the rapid expansion of these systems have come the inevitable complaints. Some are at least understandable – sloppily parked bikes can obstruct sidewalks. But a lot of the animosity toward dockless...

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  • January 21, 2018 | CityLab

    Should Transit Agencies Panic?

    Private firms are muscling-in on the elite end of the business. Uber and Lyft may be responsible for about a 6 percent shift in ridership away from transit. But they are also unprofitable, which means they may be unsustainable, even while charging fares that most citizens could not afford for...

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  • January 19, 2018 | CityLab

    Could Congestion Pricing Finally Work for New York City?

    A fee-based plan may be the only hope for the city’s costly transportation crisis. Currently, there is still no precedent for a true congestion pricing scheme in the United States. That could soon change, if a much-anticipated report by Fix NYC, a traffic advisory panel appointed by New York...

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  • January 19, 2018 | CityLab

    Is Driver's Ed Only for Rich Kids Now?

    As states have stopped funding driver’s education, participation has declined – and it’s lower-income teens and teens of color who are missing out. Whereas taking driver’s education was a given in the late 1980s in Michigan since young drivers were trained through the public school system for...

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  • January 17, 2018 | Sightline Institute

    Your Car of the Future Is No Car At All

    Aside from the immense potential for good that Transportation as a Service (TaaS) can offer, there are various pitfalls, disruptions, and downsides to take into account. Amongst the negative impacts that could result from shifting from personally owned vehicles to self-driving electric car...

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  • January 12, 2018 | Next City

    Seattle's DOT is Rethinking Transportation Equity

    In one of its first actions of 2018, the Seattle City Council unanimously adopted a resolution affirming its commitment to racial equity and social justice in transportation planning. The resolution states that the Department of Transportation (SDOT) will provide “accessible and affordable...

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  • January 11, 2018 | Business Insider

    Ford GoBike Bike Share System Passes Growth Milestones

    The number of Bay Area residents who have signed up for Ford GoBike’s discounted memberships has nearly tripled since September 2017, thanks to vigorous efforts to inform low-income communities about the Bike Share for All discount program. Almost 1,500 residents are enrolled via the $5...

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  • December 18, 2017 | Next-Gen Transportation News

    CARB Approves Major Clean Transportation Funding Plan

    The California Air Resources Board has approved a $663 million low-carbon transportation plan to increase the use of clean cars, heavy-duty trucks, buses and freight equipment. According to CARB, the funding will help the state cut climate-changing gases while promoting technologies that reduce...

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  • December 14, 2017 | Johns Creek Patch

    Bus Rapid Transit Among Fulton Transportation Options

    After six months of extensive analysis, robust public engagement and comprehensive study, a series of Fulton County transit expansion scenarios were presented for review and discussion at a recent meeting of Fulton County commissioners and mayors. The options, which were developed as part of the...
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  • December 11, 2017 | NextCity

    California Cities to Launch Biggest Electric Bike-Share System in U.S.

    Davis, California has long held a special place among U.S. bicycle cities. In 1967, it was the first to paint official bike lanes. It has since built bike infrastructure on 76 percent of its streets, which has helped boost the city's bike commuter mode share to a nation-leading 20 percent....
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  • December 11, 2017 | StreetsBlog USA

    After Harvey, Houston Leaders Look to Rebuild Around Transit

    It's been about three months since the deluge of Hurricane Harvey inflicted an estimated $200 billion in damage on the Houston region. The recovery is just beginning. Billions in federal support will be flowing into the city. Texas Governor Greg Abbott recently requested $61 billion in relief in...
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  • December 06, 2017 | Capital Gazette

    Transportation Should Be About Choice

    How do you travel from home to work? Or to school, shopping or recreation? Do you feel you have choices? Many believe a car is the only option. But for others a car is not affordable. So what are your alternatives? Do you drive, walk or bike? Do you take a train or a bus? Do you use Uber? What...
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  • December 04, 2017 | State Smart Transportation Initiative

    Multimodal Transportation and Income Equity Fit Hand-in-Glove

    One recent study finds that cities offering diverse transportation options have the lowest income inequality, while another study finds that transit systems may begin to struggle as lower income families are pushed away from the city center. These works demonstrate that preserving access to...
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