News

  • August 14, 2014 | No Sitting on the Sidelines. What Role Will You Play in Advancing Transportation Equity?

    No Sitting on the Sidelines. What Role Will You Play in Advancing Transportation Equity?

    PolicyLink and partners hosted a national tele-conference to explore state and regional efforts to ensure transportation connects all people to work and opportunity. Joining the conversation were local equity advocates and national experts who illustrated—through data and stories—the significant...

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  • August 11, 2014 | When transit service is substandard, can we plan for capital expansion?

    When transit service is substandard, can we plan for capital expansion?

    Public transportation expenditures are typically divided into two buckets: One for operations expenditures — the money that goes primarily to pay the costs of gas, electricity, and driver labor — and the other for capital investments, which sometimes means maintenance but often means new...

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  • August 08, 2014 | Concerns grow over `transit desert` in Chicago

    Concerns grow over `transit desert` in Chicago

    More than 400 thousand Cook County residents live in “transit deserts” and face more difficulty and potential cost in getting around. A study from the Center for Neighborhood Technology defined a transit desert to be more than a half mile from a rail stop or at least one quarter of a mile from...

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  • August 07, 2014 | Pedestrians Dying at Disproportionate Rates in America's Poorer Neighborhoods

    Pedestrians Dying at Disproportionate Rates in America's Poorer Neighborhoods

    Many cities have made pedestrian safety a priority, but their efforts rarely focus on poorer areas, which have approximately double the fatality rates of wealthier communities.In the nation’s metro areas, the bottom third of Census tracts, in terms of per capita income, recorded pedestrian...
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  • August 01, 2014 | Continued Jobs Growth. But Highway Bill Shows Austerity Still Hurts.

    Continued Jobs Growth. But Highway Bill Shows Austerity Still Hurts.

    Today’s Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs report finds payroll employment increased by 209,000 in July, slightly slower growth than last month, and the unemployment rate ticked up slightly to 6.2 percent. Coming after this week’s GDP report that found the economy was actually growing in the...

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  • July 15, 2014 | How Low-Income Commuters View Cycling

    How Low-Income Commuters View Cycling

    New data from the U.S. Census Bureau offers encouraging news for cyclists: Nationally, bicycle commuting increased 61 percent between the 2000 Census and a 2008-2012 survey. But there's considerable work to do before we bike ride into the sunset. Our research shows that in some places, the...

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  • July 03, 2014 | How 3 Communities Fought Discriminatory Transportation Policies

    How 3 Communities Fought Discriminatory Transportation Policies

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, which outlawed discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.To celebrate the occasion, PolicyLink held a discussion this week about how that legislation has affected transportation policy. Three local...

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  • June 06, 2014 | New Orleans Fast-Tracks Equitable Transit Investment

    New Orleans Fast-Tracks Equitable Transit Investment

    Barbara Major thinks of transportation as more than a way to help people get around. As one of the nation's largest public investments, it can be a powerful engine for equitable economic growth.
     
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  • May 31, 2014 | Bloomberg News

    House Proposal to Boost Highway Fund Hits Senate Resistance

    A proposal House Republican leaders outlined yesterday to shore up the U.S. Highway Trust Fund by curbing Saturday mail delivery has met quick Senate opposition. Delaware Democratic Senator Tom Carper, chairman of his chamber’s governmental affairs panel that handles postal issues, said the plan...

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  • May 28, 2014 | The Hill

    Transportation advocates hail Maya Angelou as streetcar pioneer

    Transportation advocates are mourning the death of legendary poet and writer Maya Angelou, who they said was "San Francisco’s first African American streetcar conductor" in addition to being a famous author. Angelou died Wednesday at age 86. The Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) union said Angelou...

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  • May 23, 2014 | StreetsBlog USA

    Study: Drivers Less Likely to Yield for Black Pedestrians

    You’ve heard the expression “driving while black?” Perhaps “walking while black” is a thing, too. A new study, by researchers from Portland State University and the University of Arizona, indicates racial biases play a role in how pedestrians are treated on the roadway.

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  • May 21, 2014 | Wired

    The 20 Deadliest U.S. Cities for Pedestrians

    Pedestrian deaths in the United States are at a five-year high, and if you’re among the few people who walks around Orlando, you’re more likely to be killed by a car than anyone else in the nation. You can thank 60 years of auto-centric planning and transportation policies for that.

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  • May 20, 2014 | Smart Growth America

    Dangerous by Design 2014 highlights preventable pedestrian fatalities

    Every day, in communities across the country, people are killed while walking to school, to work or to the store. From 2003 to 2012, more than 47,000 people were killed while walking – sixteen times the number of people who died in natural disasters, but without the corresponding level of...

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  • May 17, 2014 | The Hill

    Obama hits GOP on infrastructure

    President Obama used his weekly address Saturday to hit House Republicans on their inaction in transportation infrastructure funding while trying to draw a stark contrast between him and the GOP on job creation. Obama warned that federal funding for transportation projects will run out this...

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  • May 16, 2014 | Huffington Post

    Let's Connect to Opportunity

    Transportation is an essential ingredient for building healthier communities. That's why an equitable and well-functioning transportation system that works for everyone is so important. Transportation connects people to jobs, schools, affordable housing, health care, grocery stores, and more.

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  • May 15, 2014 | The Hill

    House silent on highway funding

    The House is staying quiet in the debate over a new transportation funding bill despite a flurry of action by senators and the Obama administration. Senate leaders this week unveiled a six-year, $265 billion road and transit funding package bill that will be marked up in committee on Thursday...

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  • May 14, 2014 | Next City

    3 Ways the Transportation Reauthorization Bill Could Affect Cities

    The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee released the MAP-21 Reauthorization Act on Monday. The bill, if passed, would reauthorize federal aid for highways, railways and all things transit. Geoff Anderson, president and CEO of Smart Growth America is a fan, and said in a press release...

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  • May 13, 2014 | StreetsBlog USA

    Barbara Boxer’s Transportation Bill: Same As It Ever Was

    The future of national transportation policy is pretty much like the present of national transportation policy, if the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee has its way: underfunded and highway-centric. The bill released by Senator Barbara Boxer’s EPW Committee yesterday rejects pretty...

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  • May 12, 2014 | Slate

    The Solution That Shall Not Be Named

    The nation’s roads and bridges are crumbling. How long can the White House and Congress ignore the common-sense fix staring them in the face? The White House is warning Congress that it has until August to find at least $18 billion for the federal account that funds the nation’s roads and public...

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  • May 09, 2014 | Poverty & Race Research Action Council

    Transit-based Opportunity—Lessons from Dayton

    The linkages between neighborhoods and academic achievement, health, and life outcomes have been thoroughly documented in research literature in recent decades. A recent story from Dayton, Ohio underscores the importance of transportation equity, and sheds light on the
    power of public transit to...
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  • May 09, 2014 | Washington Post

    On a Personal Note: Reflections from a congressman’s funeral

    As dozens of members of Congress filed off a bus from the Capitol, a group that included Democrats and Republicans who had worked with Jim Oberstar over his long career, undoubtedly most of them on the Transportation Committee, I remembered something the late congressman told me several years...

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  • May 05, 2014 | StreetsBlog USA

    Remembering Jim Oberstar, Architect of Federal Bike Funding Programs

    Rep. Jim Oberstar died peacefully in his sleep early Saturday morning at the age of 79. He represented Minnesota’s 8th Congressional district for 18 terms, from 1975 to 2011. Oberstar served on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee the entire time, and as its chair for the last four...

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  • March 12, 2014 | MinuteMan News Center

    Affordable Housing Should Suit Community Needs Not Developers

    The town needs affordable housing, and it’s in my backyard. Individuals also have the right to build as the zoning allows. Developers, though, want zoning to suit their needs, not those of the community. The operator of the 54-unit got his after the Zoning Board foolishly killed the project...
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  • March 12, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    How a System for Shared Taxi Rides Could Transform New York City

    The Senseable City Lab submitted a public records request to the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission for all its data on those 150 million trips from 2011. They've mapped it in gorgeous, interactive detail, as part of the HubCab project unveiled today. Even more usefully, though, they've...

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  • March 11, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    A Big Legal Blow to the the Rails-to-Trails Movement

    You can find them in every state of the union, from Maine to Hawaii, from Alaska to Florida: old railroad rights of way that have been or are being converted to trails for biking, hiking, and other recreational uses. As many as 1,400 such trails covering perhaps 15,000 miles have been built...

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  • March 11, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    The Race is On for the Transit Ticket of Tomorrow

    With the mTicket app on your smartphone, you've got another choice. With a swipe of the screen, just select your destination from a list of stations, authorize a charge to your credit card, and show the conductor the time-stamped virtual ticket glowing on your phone. It doesn't cost extra to buy...

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  • March 11, 2014 | Wired

    Why More Americans are Riding Public Transit than Ever Before

    Americans are using public transit more than ever, according to a study that further proves people are increasingly comfortable riding buses and trains. According to the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), Americans took 10.7 billion trips on public transit last year, matching a...
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  • March 10, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    The Big City Bike Parking Negative Feedback Loop

    Everybody knows that parking is a big problem in New York. Sometimes it seems as if there’s no place to secure your vehicle. It can be infuriating searching for a spot. Especially if your vehicle is a bicycle. Despite the installation of hundreds of new bike racks around the city over the past...
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  • March 10, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    London's Plan to Move Cyclists to Side Streets

    After years of planning, London is finally poised to witness a quiet revolution for two-wheeled transport: an exhaustive citywide network of new cycle routes. This overhaul will nonetheless be coming with a substantial twist. As a visitor to the city, you might possibly never come across a...

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  • March 10, 2014 | Alliance for Biking & Walking

    In Citi Bike's Success, Advocates and Nonprofits Played a Key Role

    Last year we launched Citi Bike, the largest bike share system in North America, in New York City. Weeks before the system opened to the public, thousands of members had already signed-up, and eagerly awaited the chance to be among the first to take a spin on one of the big blue bikes. Less than...

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  • March 07, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    Braving the Deep, Deadly South on a Bicycle

    According to a benchmark study, released last year by the National Alliance for Biking and Walking, the states of the southern U.S. are the most dangerous per biker, and per bike mile traveled, by a wide margin. If you bike in South Carolina you are 10 times likelier to be hit and killed by a...

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  • March 06, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    America's Cities are Still too Afraid to Make Driving Unappealing

    There are ways to do it. We could reduce parking availability or raise parking rates. We could implement congestion pricing. We could roll back subsidies for gas and highways and public parking garages. We could tie auto-insurance rates or infrastructure taxes to how much people actually drive.

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  • March 06, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    This Addictive New Game Lets You Build Your Own Subway System

    Fed up with your city's metro? Think you can do better? Here's your chance. New game "Mini Metro" lets you design your own subway system. Train speeds and commuter behavior are automated, so your task is simple: draw the routes that'll get the trains to run as efficiently as possible.
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  • March 04, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    Bike-Share Hit Yet Another Snag in Portland, Oregon

    Portland, Oregon, is probably the most bike-centric city in the United States, with enviably advanced bike infrastructure, the country's highest percentage of two-wheeled commuters (just over 6 percent), and a robust cohort of riders (ridiculed to national acclaim on the IFC series...
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  • March 04, 2014 | The Atlantic Cities

    How Buenos Aires Unclogged its Most Iconic Street

    The postcard image of this proud city is Avenida 9 de Julio, a triumphant boulevard that is by some accounts the widest street in the world. There’s two parts to the picture everyone knows. One is the towering Obelisk commemorating the founding of Buenos Aires. The other is the 20 lanes of...

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