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Categories: Labor & Employment

Working Together: A Systems Approach for Transit Training

This publication draws example from the Center’s national labor-management committees, which have met regularly for several years to develop consensus training guidelines. These joint committees have focused on five transit maintenance occupations: bus, rail signals, traction power, rail vehicles and transit elevator/escalator. A parallel joint effort has been crafting a national framework for...

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Categories: Health

The Hidden Health Costs of Transportation Backgrounder

This report outlines how the connection between health and the built environment impacts the pocketbook; it also provides a summary of the process of planning, funding and building transportation systems, and discusses key opportunities for public health professionals to get involved in the process. 

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All Aboard! Making Equity and Inclusion Central to Federal Transportation Policy

In this executive summary, PolicyLink addresses the key issues that comprise the quest for equitable transportation policies in three broad categories: shaping communities, powering the economy, and influencing health. We also summarize recommendations for the next federal transportation authorization organized around the broader equity questions: Who benefits? Who pays? Who decides?

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Categories: Housing

Walking the Walk: Executive Summary

Analyzed data from 94,000 real estate transactions in 15 major markets and found that in 13 of the 15 markets, higher levels of walkability, as measured by Walk Score, were directly linked to higher home values. Key Finding: Houses with the above-average levels of walkability command a premium of about $4,000 to $34,000 over houses with just average levels of walkability.

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Aging Americans: Stranded Without Options

The demographics of the United States will change dramatically during the next 25 years as more baby boomers reach their 60s, 70s, and beyond. The U.S. Census Bureau projects that the number of Americans age 65 or older will swell from 35 million to more than 62 million by 2025- nearly an 80 percent increase. As people grow older today. they often become less willing or able to drive, making...

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